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Employee Engagement

7 Deadly Sins of Employee Engagement

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Even with the best of intentions, some of the methods chosen to improve employee engagement can backfire. Employee engagement can improve retention, strengthen a company culture and increase productivity, but all that quickly is ruined when any of these seven deadly sins is committed.

  1. Engagement before and after the onboarding process

“New hires can’t be disengaged; they just got here,” said no “best company” ever. Those who know better realize addressing employee engagement starts before day one. The origins of commitment happen during the interview process. Your job candidate is evaluating you as much as you are evaluating them.

Did the interviewer begin on time, was he or she prepared and gracious? Or, was the interview an afterthought and chaotic? Top talent will recognize how much intention you put into the interview preparation. The interview experience often speaks of company culture and sets expectations for employee engagement.

The onboarding process can be stressful for any new hire. With new information flooding their inbox, a new hire easily can become overwhelmed. New hire anxiety can be mitigated by training your managers with the best onboarding and engagement strategies in order to avoid an onslaught of information on day one.

Bottom line: If your company is ignoring early signs of a stressed employee, there’s a chance you have an engagement problem.

  1. Don’t reward employees with pay alone

It’s been said that “money motivates,” but have you ever stopped to consider the effect it really has? Several surveys through the years indicate money is not a leading contributor for employee motivation.

Higher drivers include:

  • peer motivation
  • the intrinsic desire to do a good job
  • encouragement and recognition
  • having a real impact

While it may be easy to give a bonus for a job well done, it’s not always the best option. Even some of the highest-paid individuals aren’t satisfied at work.

To improve engagement, show more appreciation with the proper thanks employees want and need.

  1. Don’t use intimidation to get results

We are impatient creatures by nature. Thanks to advances in technology, we are empowered to feel this way. When employees aren’t picking up a task quickly enough or things aren’t going as planned, it’s easy to feel as if intimidation will be effective.

But often, intimidation does more harm than good. Your employees want to feel safe, not like they are walking on eggshells. Leave your frustration at the door; there are far better behaviors for improving engagement.

  1. Give attention when needed

Not every employee requires your attention. Highly engaged employees are likely in a good headspace and don’t need the extra push. However, certain employees require more attention, especially new hires.

Don’t expend all your energy on someone who isn’t in need; this only wastes his or her time and yours. Closely monitor your workforce to determine where your attention is needed, as this will change from time to time.

  1. Don’t let issues play out how they will

There will be times when employees disagree with one another; however, if there is tension to any situation, management must step in. The fate of the argument cannot be left to chance. Employees, for the most part, can solve problems on their own, but tension is a completely different beast and, if handled improperly, can be detrimental to engagement. Not only that, ignoring festering employee issues could lead the company into terminating valuable talent or become involved in expensive and time-consuming litigation. At the very least, you could spend a large amount of your time and brainpower filling out paperwork or mediating in the HR conference room.

  1. Don’t survey employees without a communication plan

Surveys can be extremely beneficial if conducted properly. If you want to fix a problem with engagement, your best bet is to ask employees what they need and how you can do better. But don’t stop there.

The most important piece of the survey process is sharing the results. Letting employees know the outcome is important to the credibility of the survey. If they feel nothing will come of it, they are less likely to answer honestly or at all.

For optimum results, implement corrective action. If there is an area of concern suggested by the results, communicate that and then have a plan to change it. Better yet, ask employees their thoughts on how to remedy the situation.

  1. Don’t engage employees without technology

Personalized service is indeed an admirable trait in any business, especially when it comes to employee engagement. Employees respect and respond well to face-to-face interactions, but that’s not to say that HR technology can’t help improve engagement.

Popular software tools, such as employee self-service portals, take center stage in companies around the nation, and the benefits that come with them extend to employee engagement.

Employees are less likely to become disengaged when they can enroll in benefits, view pay stubs, submit time-off requests, take training courses, and access and sign reviews online – all from the comfort of home. Everything they need is at their fingertips, and that is a game changer.

Employee engagement certainly is worth addressing, so don’t give in to any of these temptations. Avoiding the aforementioned will keep your organization’s culture from going six feet under.


Chad Raymond

by Chad Raymond


Author Bio: With over 19 years of experience in employee engagement, benefits administration and government compliance, Chad has unparalleled knowledge in the fields of leadership and human resources. Chad has worked in several different capacities with Paycom including leading our product development team and HCM initiatives as well as the former director of Paycom’s service department. Chad’s vision and execution helped empower executives and their teams to reach their full potential, ultimately leading to his role as Paycom’s vice president of HR.

California

How Employers Can Look to California as a Trendsetter

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It seems that every year, California imposes another piece of legislation upon employers that hasn’t even been considered in any other state, let alone passed, and many California cities have their own set of complex ordinances. However, instead of thinking as California as an island or an anomaly, savvy business professionals should take a moment to consider how such laws would affect your company, even if you don’t yet have any employees in California. Why? History has shown that California is a trendsetter.

Be sure to subscribe to the HR Break Room to learn more on past, present and future California Laws and how they may soon affect your company.

Medical Marijuana

In 1996, the first time in history, marijuana was approved for medical use at the state level when California voters passed Proposition 215. Twenty-two years later, 30 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam approve the use of medical marijuana in some form or fashion. And the other states?  Kentucky, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Utah are all poised to consider medical marijuana legalization later this year.

Medical marijuana legislation may not be considered employment law traditionally, but there are a multitude of employment implications.

Questions for employers:

  • How should you craft company policy balancing an employees’ legal right to medically use marijuana with the interest of maintaining a safe work environment?
  • When can you fire an employee for marijuana use?
  • How are your organization’s mandatory drug tests affected?
  • What should your HR department do when an employee protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act requests a medical marijuana accommodation?

 

Local Minimum Wages

San Francisco was one of the first two cities to pass a local minimum wage in 2003, along with Santa Fe, New Mexico. Nine years later, California and New Mexico began the local minimum wage movement in earnest with the passage of minimum wages in San Jose and Albuquerque. Currently, 22 different California cities or counties have their own minimum wage regulations.

Questions for Employers:

  • How are you going to react if a local minimum wage is passed in a city where you have employees?
  • Does your HR team watch for such ordinances and have the flexibility to raise employees’ pay in order to remain compliant?
  • Are you flexible enough to pay an employee different minimum wages when he or she works in multiple localities with such ordinances in the same pay period?

 

Paid Sick Leave

San Francisco, again, spearheaded expanded worker protections in 2006 when it passed the first paid sick leave law in the nation. Additionally, it is currently the furthest reaching of such laws, providing protections for any worker—part time, temporary, or full time—who works within the city for an employer. Since then, 29 other California cities or counties have enacted paid sick leave laws, as well as eight states and Washington, D.C.

Question for Employers:

  • Can you ensure your accrual system separately tracks required paid sick leave for employees in all municipalities and states you operate and if your employees work or travel to those localities in question?

 

What’s Ahead: Predictive Scheduling and Equal Pay Laws

What additional California trends should employers keep an eye on?

First, consider predictive scheduling laws, which require employers to abide by certain scheduling procedures and penalize those that do not. To the surprise of no one, San Francisco was the first locality to pass such a predictive scheduling law in 2014. Following suit, Emeryville, CA, Seattle and New York City passed predictive scheduling laws that went into effect last year. Oregon was the first to enact state-wide legislation. While it is early in the predictive scheduling law movement, many other states and municipalities, even the United States Congress, have introduced predictive scheduling legislation.  Your state or city could be next.

And finally, equal pay laws. Sure, the federal Equal Pay Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act has been around since the 1960s and states have had some protections for years, but the movement of further expanding and enforcing the prohibition of pay disparity has recently increased and has two distinct iterations:

  1. Creating general prohibitions against pay disparity and mechanisms to enforce those prohibitions.
  2. Inhibiting employers making pay decisions on salary history.

 

In 2015, the California Fair Pay Act, touted by The Los Angeles Times as “[maybe] the nation’s most aggressive attempt yet to close the salary gap between men and women” was signed into law. Right on the heels of California, New York expanded equal pay protections with the 2015 passage of a group of bills in known as the Women’s Equality Agenda.

In 2016, the California Fair Pay Act was amended to also prohibit pay gaps on the basis of race and ethnicity, not just sex, and prohibits employers from justifying disparities solely on the basis of prior salary. 2016 also brought equal pay law amendments in Nebraska and Massachusetts and another state pay equity laws in Maryland. Oregon and Puerto Rico followed suit in 2017. Massachusetts became the first to pass a law restricting employers from inquiring about salary history in 2016.  California, Oregon, Delaware, Puerto Rico, New York City, San Francisco and Philadelphia followed in 2017.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission proposed in 2016 to collect a summary of pay data by race, ethnicity and sex from employers in addition to the current EEO-1 report. This data would allow the EEOC to more effectively tackle pay disparity. This data collection was put on hold, though, in August 2017 before it went into effect. At the same time, California was considering a bill similarly requiring employers to collect data on gender wage differentials. This bill was passed by the legislature in September following the announcement that the EEOC was putting a hold on its efforts. However, the bill was eventually vetoed by the governor. This type of law is likely to make another showing in California, and most certainly other states as well.

As you can see, California has started many employment law movements (and these were just a few). Click here, here and here to see a few recent laws that may be impacting your city or state in the near future.

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Posted in Blog, California, Compliance, Featured

Alyssa Looney

by Alyssa Looney


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Alyssa Looney monitors laws, rules and regulations to ensure that the Paycom software is up to date, specifically regarding immigration law and state law developments in the Western United States. She holds a JD and an MBA from Pennsylvania State University, as well as a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University. Outside of work, Alyssa enjoys cooking, being active, playing with her puppy and exploring Oklahoma City.

Death of an employee

Staying Compliant After the Death of an Employee

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When an employee passes away, you need time to process your emotions. But as an HR professional, there are also timely actions you should take to help your workforce grieve, and a few things you’ll need to address to remain compliant. While the death of an employee is never easy, it’s important to ensure any compliance matters are handled consistently with your current policies but with added grace.

Initial Steps

Although your employee wasn’t actually terminated, it’s still a best practice to follow your existing termination checklist. The checklist will help you determine what security access the deceased had so you can disable or redirect it. It will also help with remembering what keys and technology (like a laptop or cellphone) the employee may have had. Be respectful of the employee’s family and ask for these items in as sensitive a manner as you can. You may work with your internal IT department to secure devices remotely, which can protect your sensitive data while you work to connect with the right family member.

In some instances, you’ll also need to obtain a death certificate from the family. This may seem like a uncomfortable request, but you’ll need the certificate before you can proceed with many of the following steps you need to take for the employee.

Paycheck

Check your state laws to make sure you’re following the correct procedure about paying final wages. For example, some states require you to pay out unused vacation. If your state doesn’t have a law, follow your company policy.

You’ll also need to find out who the deceased’s beneficiary is so you will know who should receive his or her final wages. This should be documented either in your HRIS system or on a form in the employee’s personnel or benefit file.  If a paycheck has already been issued, but not cashed, you should reissue the check to the deceased’s beneficiary or estate.

COBRA and Life Insurance

If the employee is covered on the benefit plans, their death is a COBRA-qualifying event. If you sponsor group health plans, you must offer a continuation of group health insurance for up to 36 months to the deceased’s surviving spouse and dependents. The family must be notified about coverage within 30 days of the deceased’s death.

Prepare any relevant information for life insurance claims, if the employee had a policy in effect. They will be dealing with so many decisions that pulling this information together for them before they request it can help give those grieving one less thing to worry about. Employers may also choose to include EAP information or other company sponsored grief resources for eligible family members.

Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA)

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 requires that retirement, pension and other plans provide survivor benefits to the surviving spouse of an employee who worked after reaching the earliest possible retirement date under the plan but passed away before retiring. Since this law only pertains to employees who were able to retire but hadn’t yet, you’ll need to refer to your company’s policies to ensure compliance if the deceased was of retirement age. Benefit administrators should contact their plan providers to confirm if there is any additional action required on the deceased employee’s behalf.

To learn more about how your business can start to build procedures for an employee’s death so you can navigate the difficult time as smoothly as possible, visit our blog, “4 Questions to Consider When Handling the Death of an Employee.”

 

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Posted in Blog, Compliance, Employment Law, Featured

Callie Johnson

by Callie Johnson


Author Bio: As a writer for Paycom, Callie Johnson creates content for the company’s various marketing and communications initiatives. Having earned her bachelor’s degrees in journalism from the University of Oklahoma and web design/development from Full Sail University, she has written for companies of all sizes. Outside of the office, she enjoys hand-lettering, going to the movies and spending time with her family and dogs.

Office Relationships

How HR Could Have Helped 3 Complicated On-screen Office Relationships

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With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, love is in the air and sometimes that romantic air makes its way into the office. Workplace romances may seem like something only seen in film or on TV, but according to Career Builder, 38% of American workers said they have dated a co-worker at least once in their career. That’s over a third of employees, which makes workplace romance an item every organization should have on its radar.

To better understand how HR can prepare and handle potentially tricky conversations, let’s take a look at three complicated workplace romances from film or television – and how HR could have helped.

Subscribe to HR Break Room to hear more about managing office romance.

Mulder and Scully – The X-files

For almost 25 years, special agents Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) from The X-Files have been solving supernatural and extraterrestrial cases on television. This pair of government agents work for one of the most well-known organizations in the country, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Throughout the series, they slowly become more than just friends or coworkers and have even become romantically involved in the most recent seasons. Each episode features a case that often involves aliens, weird occurrences … and yet another development in Mulder and Scully’s evolving relationship.

How HR can help: The on-again, off-again relationship between Mulder and Scully has left audiences wondering about their status for years. That ambiguity is what makes their relationship unhealthy for the workplace. It’s important for an organization’s policy to hold employees accountable for reporting a romantic relationship with a co-worker. This transparency allows HR to hold a consistent policy that can protect both employees if they break up.

Tom and Summer – 500 Days of Summer

The greeting card industry can be tough, but a brutal breakup in the office can make it even harder! Just ask Tom Hansen (Joseph Gordon Levitt) and Summer Finn (Zooey Deschanel) from the 2009 hit romance film, 500 Days of Summer. The romance that sparked between this on-screen couple turned out to be a bad fit that eventually led to Tom’s depression and complete disengagement from his work. It’s a classic example of how even the most beautiful romances can sometimes go sour.

 How HR can help: It’s important for HR to treat their employees like adults who are allowed to make their own mistakes. It is equally important for managers and supervisors to know about office romances so they can be prepared to handle potential drama.

In this film, Summer is the personal secretary of Tom’s manager, Vance. As the long and painful breakup unfolds, Vance is not clued in on the reason behind Tom’s disengagement, which leads to awkward workplace encounters and poor productivity. By incorporating some form of documentation confirming a workplace relationship into your organization’s policy for managers and team leads, you can foster a culture that equips leaders to better address the impact of those painful breakups.

Lois and Clark – Superman

The iconic comic book couple Lois and Clark have appeared on the screen together many times over the last several decades, but let’s take a look at the 1975 film Superman starring Christopher Reeve and Margot Kidder. Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Lois Lane works closely with Clark Kent, who (unbeknownst to her) lives a life of fighting criminals. In the workplace, they are coworkers with great chemistry, but Lois’ professional-turned-romantic relationship with Clark’s alter ego, Superman, eventually makes her and the entire Daily Planet a target of his rivals. Clark’s dual identities complicate the root of the problem within the workplace, so that his interest in Lois puts the entire organization at risk.

How HR can help: Krypton’s last son may be great at hiding his identity, but ultimately living a life of two identities endangers people in both. That includes his coworkers Jimmy Olson, Perry White and most importantly, his romantic interest, Lois Lane.

It’s up to The Daily Planet’s HR department to screen their candidates through an applicant tracking system with thorough background checks before making a hiring decision. This can help identify potential red flags or conflicts of interest before a new employee joins the team.

 This Valentine’s Day, take the opportunity to look closer at your existing workplace romantic relationship policies. These stories make for great entertainment – but an effective policy on workplace romance can help you make sure the drama stays on the screen and out of your office.

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Posted in Blog, Featured, Talent Management

caleb.masters

by Caleb Masters


Author Bio: Caleb is the host of The HR Break Room and a Webinar and Podcast Producer at Paycom. With more than 5 years of experience as a published online writer and content producer, Caleb has produced dozens of podcasts and videos for multiple industries both local and online. Caleb continues to assist organizations creatively communicate their ideas and messages through researched talks, blog posts and new media. Outside of work, Caleb enjoys running, discussing movies and trying new local restaurants.

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