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Redefine Employee Engagement Today for a Prosperous Tomorrow

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Whether it’s improving employee engagement, increasing growth opportunities, achieving greater efficiencies or expanding skill sets, organizations across the country have similar goals. That means they also face many of the same challenges. With the correct learning management system (LMS), organizations can better meet these demands, while also creating a more nimble and productive workforce.

Before diving any further into the benefits of LMS, we must first look at one of the largest problems facing organizations today: the engagement crisis.

Employee engagement can’t be an afterthought anymore. It has too much impact on a company’s bottom line. According to research firm Bersin & Associates, companies spend nearly $720 million a year on engagement, and forecasts predict the amount soon will grow to about $1.5 billion. If companies are spending roughly half of what is estimated for the near future, what do they have to show for it now?

Deloitte’s global study of human capital trends paints a clearer picture of companies struggling to engage our 21st-century workforce. Only 13 percent of employees worldwide are actively engaged at work. Furthermore, when asked to evaluate their performance-management practices, only six percent believe their current process is worth the time, while 58 percent called their process “weak.”

Redefining engagement

When thinking of this new world of employee engagement, consider it a commitment to achieve an organization’s overarching goals and motivation for employees to contribute to overall business success.

But herein lies the problem: Today’s workforce has evolved; its members want and expect more out of the companies for which they work. Previous views of engagement have to change if organizations want to address the issue at hand.

Engagement isn’t something you can just “fix.” Organizations have to make a long-term commitment to continuously help employees learn and grow. Successful engagement is typically measured through one-on-ones and surveys, which could be conducted annually, quarterly or monthly, depending on your preferred frequency.

Time for innovative engagement strategies

How long does it take your new hires to reach full productivity? Is your employee training consistent across your locations? It pays to find out.

As business demands evolve, professionals at all levels have to continuously re-skill themselves to stay current and relevant. Corporate training programs should evolve as well to provide employees long-term development paths, up-to-date content and a more engaging digital learning experience.

This is the first post in our four-part series. Stay tuned to learn how your company can utilize a learning management system to drive organizational capability.


brooklyn.workman

by Brooklyn Workman


Author Bio: Brooklyn Workman is a graduate from Oklahoma State University where she double majored in accounting and agricultural communications. Brooklyn worked for Paycom upon graduation and served as both a sales representative and client relations representative. Brooklyn enjoys working hands-on with clients to provide them with solution sets that streamline their business operations. She now serves as the Director of Business Development where she oversees the ongoing development of new solutions and the evolution of Paycom’s existing products like benefits administration, performance and compensation management, COBRA, garnishments and document management among others.

3 Tips for Your Next Performance Review

3 Tips for Your Next Performance Review

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3 Tips for Your Next Performance Review

Are you dreading your next annual performance review? Not sure what to expect, or how to prepare?

Annual performance reviews should encourage growth, celebrate achievements and set goals for the coming year. Here are a few tips to help you get the most out of your next review.

3 Mistakes Managers Make During Performance Reviews (And How to Fix Them)

1. Keep an Open Mind

As hard as it is to give constructive feedback, receiving it can be harder. But, keep in mind that the intentions of the review is to summarize what has been discussed throughout the year and encourage continual growth.

 Come with an open mind and the perspective that the constructive feedback given is a type of investment the employer is making in you. The employer sees value in your contribution to the team, and he or she wants to challenge you continually to be the best you can be.

 2. Be Confident

Don’t undersell yourself! Instead, be confident in your skills and abilities. Your manager will recognize your strengths and contributions to the business. Confidence can lead to the opportunity to handle new and bigger projects.

3. Speak Up

Sometimes, the performance review can turn into a one-sided conversation, with the employer doing all of the talking. But it doesn’t have to be that way. If you wish to discuss a particular topic or concern, wait until the moment is right and respectfully address it.

In addition, be prepared to give honest feedback on your productivity and potential growth opportunity. If you are unsure, do not hesitate to ask for clarification before and during the performance review.

A good performance review should leave you feeling inspired to set and meet higher goals, and appreciated for your accomplishments.

 

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Posted in Blog, Featured, Leadership, Talent Management

Brad Taylor

by Brad Taylor


Author Bio: As Vice President of Product Management, Brad Taylor currently manages a team dedicated to the continuous improvement of Paycom’s single-application solution and product innovation. In his nearly two decades at Paycom, he previously served in six roles, including Vice President of Client Relations and Vice President of Sales. A graduate of the University of Oklahoma, Brad is an avid OU football fan and enjoys spending time with his wife and children.

Different Generations

Workplace Communication Across Different Generations

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Workplace Communication Across Different Generations

Managers face many difficult challenges in the workplace, but one obstacle that often is overlooked is the need to communicate with up to five different generations in a single office setting. From the 18-year-old intern to the 72-year-old seasoned professional, human resources professionals need to find a balance between them and a method of expression that reaches them both – along with every age in between.

The Four Generations

Thanks to healthier living and later retirement, organizations potentially can be staffed with individuals from every life stage. Each generation has their own needs and each is capable of bringing unique assets to the workforce.

According to the Pew Research Center, the generations consist of:

  1. Born from 1980 to 2000: Generation Y or millennials
  2. Born from 1965 to 1980: Generation X
  3. Born from 1946 to 1964: baby boomers
  4. Born from 1945 and before: traditionalists or the silent generation

This mix of ages adds diversity, but can also create a few challenges, especially as it relates to communication. When done right, communicating with employees across generations can be an advantage of the workforce.

Use Different Communication Tools

When traditionalists and baby boomers were entering the workforce, computers didn’t exist. Millennials, however, have never known life without a smartphone, which makes a world of knowledge available at their fingertips. When sending company-wide information, consider utilizing different communication tools to ensure each generation feels comfortable and fully grasps the meaning and significance of the material.

In Person: Arrange for meetings or one-on-one discussions for important information, particularly when involving traditionalists, who may lean towards such formalities as the norm.

Phone Call: Baby boomers prefer phone calls for important information. Traditionalists, who may have been introduced to the rotary phone in their childhood, utilize landlines for much of their day-to-day communication. Both generations may or may not feel comfortable using a smartphone.

Email: Gen Xers prefer email correspondence, while baby boomers and millennials are all accepting of its use in business. Traditionalists should be capable of using email, but typically prefer more personal methods of communication.

Text: Millennials were born in an era when texting was common, and they find its use easy and often preferred.

Social Media: Millennials consider social media a part of their life, often without differentiating between what’s personal and what’s professional. LinkedIn is typically considered the most office-friendly social media option, while Facebook – with its game invites – is often forbidden at work.

Office communication programs: Programs such as Skype for Business, Slack, Ryver or Bitrix24 are excellent alternatives to public social media options. These sites allow co-workers to discuss projects as well as lunch.

Learning management system (LMS): Communicating through an LMS allows users to gain knowledge while staying up-to-date on corporate training requirements. LMS courses can come in the form of video, podcasts or PowerPoint presentations. Millennials are particularly accepting of continuous learning and on-demand instruction options via desktop computer or mobile device.

Recognize Differences

Remember that these are merely generalizations and managers, supervisors and HR leaders should never assume anything about their employees. A traditionalist may use his iPhone for all correspondence while a millennial may prefer the feel of keys beneath her fingers. Research on human diversity reveals that making assumptions about employees based on age – or any other characteristic – should be avoided. As leaders in the workplace, human resources professionals should practice breaking down stereotypes, not encouraging them.

Acknowledging the distinct mannerisms among the generations can result in new ideas and a chance for everyone to learn and grow. Hiring for diversity is essential; now take advantage of those inherent differences among your employees.

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Posted in Blog, Employee Engagement, Featured, Leadership, Talent Management


Author Bio: A writer, speaker and young business leader, Jason has been the communications pulse for a number of organizations, including Paycom. A featured writer on human capital management technology, leadership and the Affordable Care Act, Jason launched Paycom’s blog and social media channels, helping empower organizations around the nation. Jason is attuned to the needs of businesses and recently helped develop a tool to aid organizations in their pursuit to comply with the ACA; one of the largest changes in healthcare the country has seen. While working in athletics for ESPN and FoxSports, Jason learned the importance of hard work and branding. In his free time he enjoys adventuring with his family, reading and exploring new areas to strengthen his business acumen.

Performance Review

3 Mistakes Managers Make During Performance Reviews (And How to Fix Them)

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3 Mistakes Managers Make During Performance Reviews (And How to Fix Them)

Are you and your employees prepared for their annual performance reviews? While every organization approaches performance reviews differently, one commonality remains the same: Performance reviews are an important part of the employer’s role.

3 Tips for Your Next Performance Review 

The approach your managers take to this conversation will set the tone for employees’ performance and engagement. Here are three mistakes – and pro-tips on how to avoid them – you might consider sharing with your managers as they prepare to give performance reviews:

1. Failing to Plan vs. Creating an Agenda

Not giving structure or guidelines at the beginning of the review will leave the employee confused, stressed and possibly feeling like a failure. Your managers could then just wing it, which could send a signal to the employee that the performance review isn’t serious. In addition, an unstructured review leads to missed opportunities to set expectations, set goals and discuss missed goals.

Instead, give the employee an outline of how the performance review will be conducted, share the review format and ensure he or she understands the expectation of their self-evaluation. Without expectation, the employee is less likely to succeed, but with clear direction and communication, the employee has a better chance of higher performance.

2. Avoiding the Issue vs. Following Up

Managers are busy with meetings, have looming deadlines, and juggle multiple projects and employees. Taking extra time to document every performance gap and identify areas of improvement for immediate correction interrupts the daily hustle. So while it may seem easier to wait a week and postpone communication until the performance review, putting off the much-needed conversation can leave issues unresolved, and cause situations to go from bad to worse.

 To avoid this, encourage your managers to follow up with their employees immediately when correction is needed. The employee should never hear about an ongoing issue for the first time during his or her review. Also, employees shouldn’t be evaluated just on their most recent performance. Ask your managers to have weekly, bi-weekly or monthly one-on-one meetings to formally discuss areas of strength and those that need improvement. 

3. Only Discussing the Failures vs. Providing Positive Praise

What happens when the conversation starts off on the wrong foot or takes a wrong turn? Your managers came prepared, but only brought a list of missed opportunities (saved from all year). If the manager does all the talking, the communication becomes one-sided, and the employee will not – and cannot – contribute. Now, the manager is left scolding the employee for his or her wrongs. That employee will leave the performance review feeling inadequate and discouraged.

 Instead, coach your managers to open the conversation with praise on the employee’s accomplishments, so that the employee understands the contribution he or she makes doesn’t go unnoticed. Remember, the delivery of a performance review sets the tone of the conversation. Ensure your managers are specific and genuine regarding accomplishments. As a result, the employee will find the review rewarding.

A good performance review should leave the employee inspired to set and meet higher goals and feel appreciated for his or her accomplishments. Remember: have a set agenda, follow up is important, give praise, communicate constructive feedback and set new goals in the next performance review.

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Posted in Blog, Featured, HR Management, Leadership, Talent Management, What Employees Want

Brad Taylor

by Brad Taylor


Author Bio: As Vice President of Product Management, Brad Taylor currently manages a team dedicated to the continuous improvement of Paycom’s single-application solution and product innovation. In his nearly two decades at Paycom, he previously served in six roles, including Vice President of Client Relations and Vice President of Sales. A graduate of the University of Oklahoma, Brad is an avid OU football fan and enjoys spending time with his wife and children.

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