Home » Our Blog » ACA-Related Costs and Premiums Predicted to Increase in 2017
back to the top
cash

ACA-Related Costs and Premiums Predicted to Increase in 2017

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Google Plus Share through email Print it More share options

ACA-Related Costs and Premiums Predicted to Increase in 2017

With the 2017 open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) or “Obamacare” just around the corner, states are beginning to approve insurer rate requests. Based on the results so far, people who buy health insurance on their own via the marketplace can expect some steep premium surges. Employers, also, can expect hikes in ACA-related costs and health insurance premiums.

Cost impacts of the ACA

Costs for the lowest and second-lowest ACA silver plans are soaring faster in 2017 than in previous years, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. For example, the cost of the second-lowest silver plan in certain major cities analyzed in the Foundation’s report is predicted to increase by a weighted average of nine percent in 2017 – a sharp jump from two percent in 2016.

Some states have already begun approving insurer rate plans, and the numbers depict some extensive premium hikes for individuals who purchase health insurance through the marketplace. Mississippi has endorsed increases of approximately 43 percent. In Tennessee, an average increase of 62 percent has been approved for one of the state’s largest marketplace plans; and California has announced an average increase of 13.2 percent.

According to Kaiser Health News, large employers expect their healthcare costs to rise by around six percent in 2017, and most employees of large businesses can expect a five-percent increase in their premiums. Based on a 2016 survey, employers are also anticipating a spike in their general administrative ACA expenses for 2017 – with reporting, disclosure and notification requirements being the primary cost drivers. There’s also the delayed 40-percent Cadillac tax on high-cost, employer-sponsored plans, which is forecast to be a significant ACA cost driver beyond 2017.

ACA penalties expected to rise

ACA penalties are expected to climb in 2017. For example, the penalty for not offering minimum essential coverage is expected to increase to $2,260 per full-time worker in 2017, compared to $2,160 in 2016. According to the Congressional Budget Office, the effect of employer penalty payments on the government’s revenue will mostly escalate in 2017 and beyond – with the biggest change being from $9 billion in 2017 to $16 billion in 2018.

Cost control measures

According to the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans, to contain ACA-related costs employers are increasing:

  • Out-of-pocket limits
  • In-network deductibles
  • Employees’ portion of premium costs
  • Copayment and coinsurance rates for primary care
  • Employees’ share of prescription drug expenses
  • Employees’ share of dependent coverage costs

Other cost-cutting strategies include:

  • Adopting high-deductible health plans
  • Expanding employee wellness programs
  • Dropping, or attaching a surcharge to spousal coverage
  • Modifying prescription drug benefits

Tax incentive for SHOP employers

Small employers who buy health insurance through the Small Business Health Options (SHOP) may qualify for the SHOP tax credit, which can help offset the cost of providing health insurance to workers. To qualify for the credit, employers must have fewer than 25 full-time equivalent employees who each earn an average salary of around $50,000 or less per year, pay at least 50 percent of their full-time employees’ premium and offer coverage to full-time employees via the SHOP marketplace. The smaller the company, the bigger the credit, which is capped at 50 percent of the employer’s contribution toward employees’ premium costs.

Businesses with fewer than 50 full-time and full-time equivalent employees are not subject to the ACA’s Employer Shared Responsibility provisions and can therefore simply choose not to offer health insurance. But, an analysis published by the New England Journal of Medicine concluded that employers competing for top talent will continue to provide health benefits and will not shift employees to an insurance marketplace – though this could change if the Cadillac tax is implemented.

DISCLAIMER: The information provided in this blog is for general informational purposes only. Accordingly, Paycom and the writer of the above content do not warrant the completeness or accuracy of the above information. It does not constitute the provision of legal advice, tax advice, accounting services, or professional consulting. The information provided herein should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional tax, accounting, legal or other professional services.

 

DISCLAIMER: The information provided in this blog is for general informational purposes only. Accordingly, Paycom and the writer of the above content do not warrant the completeness or accuracy of the above information. It does not constitute the provision of legal advice, tax advice, accounting services, or professional consulting. The information provided herein should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional tax, accounting, legal or other professional services.



Author Bio: Jason Bodin has been the communications pulse for a number of organizations, including Paycom, where he serves as director of public relations and corporate communications. He helped launch Paycom’s blog, webinar platform and social media channels. He aided in the development of Paycom’s tool to assist organizations in complying with the Affordable Care Act, one of the largest changes in health care the country has seen. A graduate of the University of Oklahoma, Bodin previously worked for ESPN and FoxSports. In his free time, he enjoys adventuring with his family, reading and strengthen his business acumen.

ACA ‘Cadillac Tax’ Delayed to 2022

ACA ‘Cadillac Tax’ Delayed to 2022

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Google Plus Share through email Print it More share options

The short-term spending bill that ended the government shutdown on Jan. 22 included a small provision that again delayed the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) “Cadillac tax,” now to 2022.

So nicknamed because it targets employer-sponsored health plans with the most generous level of benefits, the Cadillac tax originally was to take effect in 2018. In 2015, the effective date was pushed to 2020, and now the new bill pushes the effective date two additional years into the future.

When – or if – the Cadillac tax goes into effect, it will impose a 40% excise on the cost of employer-sponsored health coverage exceeding a certain dollar value per employee. The dollar value would have been $10,200 for individual coverage and $27,500 for family coverage in 2018, had the tax not been delayed. The law calls for the amount to be adjusted annually with growth in the consumer price index.

How does this affect Employers?

Employers do not have to contend with the tax for an additional two years. The IRS has not yet issued regulations addressing implementation; with this additional delay, the agency likely will not do so in the near future.

Disclaimer: This blog includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. You need to contact a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal problems.

Tags: , ,
Posted in ACA, Blog, Compliance, Featured

Erin Maxwell

by Erin Maxwell


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Erin Maxwell monitors legal and regulatory changes at the state and federal level, focusing on health and employee benefits laws, to ensure the Paycom system is updated accordingly. She previously served as assistant general counsel at Asset Servicing Group in Oklahoma City. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and a J.D. from the University of Oklahoma. Outside of work, Maxwell enjoys politics, historical mysteries and spending time with her family.

Deadline Extended

Employer Deadline Extended for Furnishing 2017 ACA Forms

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Google Plus Share through email Print it More share options

Distribution of 2017 Affordable Care Act (ACA) Forms 1095-B or -C to your employees has been extended.

As issued in Notice 2018-06, the IRS has extended the deadline from Jan. 31 to March 2. (However, the deadline to provide Forms W-2 and 1099 to employees and contract workers remains as Jan. 31.)

Filing deadlines unchanged

While the deadline to furnish forms was extended, the filing deadlines remain the same: Feb. 28 for paper forms, and April 2 for electronic forms.

IRS Notice 2018-06 emphasizes that employers who do not comply with the due dates for furnishing or filing are subject to penalties under sections 6722 or 6721.

Good-faith transition relief extended

The IRS also announced the extension of good-faith transition relief. This may allow an employer to avoid some penalties if it can show that it made good-faith efforts to comply with the information reporting requirements for 2017.

This relief applies only to incorrect and incomplete information reported on the ACA forms, and not to a failure to file or furnish the forms in a timely manner. Additionally, the IRS stated it does not anticipate extending either the good-faith transition relief or the furnishing deadline in future years.

Contact a trusted tax professional if you have questions on how this may affect your business specifically.

Click here to read more about how the ACA is affect by the new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

Disclaimer: This blog includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. You need to contact a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal problems.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in ACA, Blog, Compliance, Featured

Erin Maxwell

by Erin Maxwell


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Erin Maxwell monitors legal and regulatory changes at the state and federal level, focusing on health and employee benefits laws, to ensure the Paycom system is updated accordingly. She previously served as assistant general counsel at Asset Servicing Group in Oklahoma City. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and a J.D. from the University of Oklahoma. Outside of work, Maxwell enjoys politics, historical mysteries and spending time with her family.

Employers Unaffected by ACA Changes in New Tax Law

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Google Plus Share through email Print it More share options

On December 22, President Trump signed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The bill includes a provision that reduces the penalty for not complying with the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) individual mandate to $0, effectively removing the penalty for individuals who do not have health insurance coverage after the effective date of Jan. 1, 2019.

However, this update will not impact employers, since the law does not remove the employer mandate (the requirement that large employers offer health insurance coverage to their full-time employees or pay a penalty) or the associated employer reporting requirements. Large employers subject to the mandate still face penalties if they fail to comply with either, and the IRS has begun sending out notices with preliminary assessments of the employer shared responsibility penalty for tax year 2015.

Employers subject to the employer mandate should continue to comply and be prepared to file Forms 1094 and 1095 with the IRS in accordance with the normal deadlines.

For the 2017 tax year, the deadlines to provide Forms 1095-C to employees is Jan. 31, 2018.  The deadline to file Forms 1094-C and 1095-C with the IRS is Feb. 28, 2018 if filing paper forms, and April 2, 2018, if filing electronically.

Disclaimer: This blog includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. You need to contact a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal problems.

Posted in ACA, Blog, Compliance, Featured

Erin Maxwell

by Erin Maxwell


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Erin Maxwell monitors legal and regulatory changes at the state and federal level, focusing on health and employee benefits laws, to ensure the Paycom system is updated accordingly. She previously served as assistant general counsel at Asset Servicing Group in Oklahoma City. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and a J.D. from the University of Oklahoma. Outside of work, Maxwell enjoys politics, historical mysteries and spending time with her family.

You might want to know our privacy policy has changed. View Policy

Okay, got it!
X

Contact Us

  • Are you a current Paycom Client?

    Yes

    No

    • Talent Acquisition

    • Time & Labor Management

    • Payroll

    • Talent Management

    • HR Management

  • Subscribe me to Paycom's newsletter.

*Required

We promise never to sell, rent or share your personal information with a third party unless required by law. By submitting this form, you accept our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.