HR Strategy

Innovation: 3 Ways Businesses Can Shoot for the Moon

By

Lauren Owens

| Oct 23, 2014

Without innovation, we’d still be staring up at the moon and wondering, “What’s it like up there?” Innovation is transformative; it turns ideas into possibilities. Take Walt Disney, for example; through innovative thinking, he was able to turn a blank canvas of land into what many people today would consider a magical escape.

Innovation doesn’t have to be groundbreaking, although it’s exciting when it is. Within your company, it may mean building upon existing products or implementing new campaign ideas. The list goes on and on, but the point is this: Embracing innovation can advance your organization to previously unreachable heights.

How One Company Embraces Innovation

It’s 1998. Connecting to the World Wide Web is cumbersome. You’re using a dial-up modem, so surfing is slow and limited. There’s got to be a better way, right?

Paycom’s visionary leaders saw the Internet’s potential for their payroll business and have been revolutionizing the industry ever since. Its client-driven, in-house development is what has pushed its proprietary payroll application to evolve into the premier technology it is today: a true single-database application that requires no integration.

Since its inception, Paycom has remained ahead of the curve on the front of single-database solutions. We understand that housing business systems in various environments creates a technology gap that can lead to users entering the same information over and over, products not syncing correctly and limitations and errors in reporting. We believe our customers deserve the best, which is why Paycom is the cloud-based provider to offer a single-database solution, where data workflow is seamless.

How Your Business Can Become Innovative

Paycom grew based on the idea that better technology would enhance the HR and payroll industry. The reason it became successful is because its founders took action. That’s the key for any business looking to improve: You have to be open and willing to take some type of action. It’s not enough to talk about doing it; we certainly didn’t get to the moon just by discussing it.

1. Start thinking innovatively
Take a good look at your organization today and ask yourself, “Do I like what you see? Are there areas for improvement?” Now fast-forward five to 10 years and speculate what your business looks like in the future. How will it evolve?

If you’ve imagined your business performing better by offering new products and better customer service, then ask yourself this: “How did these things happen?” The proof is in the plan. The volatile market is a challenge to navigate; however, that shouldn’t stop you from looking ahead. Thinking creatively and planning for the future will lift your business above the competition.

2. Use your best resource: your employees
Don’t go in this alone. Remember, behind you stands a whole team whose members know your business better than anyone. Tap into their knowledge. Your employees have valuable opinions as to where your business is headed and what obstacles you may face in the future.

It is also a good idea to involve your customers in the process. These people have made an investment in your company and may provide valuable insight into what direction your company should take moving forward. Much can emerge from a little collaboration. At the very least, it doesn’t hurt to listen!

3. Take action
An idea is one thing, but it’s what you do with that idea that effects change. If you think your business isn’t garnering the attention it deserves, create an awesome marketing campaign. Perhaps you’ve received a few complaints from customers about your services; then go back to the drawing board. In the end, no one scores a big play from sitting idly on the bench.

About the Author

Lauren Owens

Lauren is an enthusiastic writer who is passionate about numerous topics surrounding the HCM industry including talent management and acquisition, technology, document management and leadership. Lauren is a former Paycom blogger, social strategist and community relations coordinator.

See more posts by Lauren Owens