HR Strategy

Vision Casting: 3 Steps for Implementing a Company Vision

By

Weylin Miller

| Oct 11, 2018

What if movie actors just read their lines rather than embraced their role? Just as casting a movie requires actors passionate about the script, a company needs employees eager to implement the company’s vision. Vision casting allows employees to invest in the organization’s future by achieving long-term goals and advancing the health of a company. Vision casting also provides employees with the opportunity to succeed in their own roles within an organization.

As with shooting a movie, vision casting isn’t always the easiest process. In order to help employees flourish personally and create company growth, organizations should focus on the following three aspects of vision casting.

Know the Vision

What is your company’s vision? Could leadership give a broad overview? If not, the vision as a whole may need some work. The vision is the framework and must define what the company hopes to be in the future. A vision statement guides organizational goals and helps shape its culture. Aligning your workforce is crucial for any organization looking for higher employee engagement and advancement within its field.

Company vision should not be shared with just the CEO and leadership. Instilling the vision within your employees can be a powerful motivator. Employees are crucial to any organization and working toward a common goal is key to achieving a vision statement.

See the Vision

Before you attempt to share the company vision with staff, there are some things you should consider. What drives your employees? What motivates them? What part do they play in achieving the company’s vision?

For example, Allie’s passion is leadership. Relating the vision statement to her current and future leadership opportunities can influence the vision itself. Using employee strengths motivates team members to achieve more for themselves and the company.

Considering how each member of your company contributes to the vision is vital for communicating it. A sales associate has a different role than a marketing intern, but both play an important part in advancing the company. If a leader doesn’t understand what motivates their team or what part they play, it can be difficult to get employees to invest in the company vision.

Share the Vision

Your employees drive your company’s success. How can they reach their destination without direction? Sharing the vision through vision casting plays a crucial part in high employee engagement.

Leaders should share the company vision often and in meaningful ways. There are plenty of approaches for this:

Daily Conversations

Make the vision statement a conversation piece. This requires an intentional effort on your part to relate discussions back to the vision. If a team member hears this regularly, they’ll know it’s important.

Monthly Meetings

Have you recently received an email from a happy client, great results from a recent survey or praise from the CEO? Sharing victories with your team during a monthly meeting is another way to remind everybody about the importance of their role and how it connects to the company’s vision.

Weekly Overviews

Find at least five minutes each week to celebrate small wins. This could be through a shout-out to team members who just completed a marathon project or stretch goal or stopping by an employee’s desk to congratulate them on their latest accomplishment. Recognition can be a powerful way to motivate and align employees with the overall vision for the company.

Handouts

Create handouts of the vision statement for team members to keep in their workstations or shared spaces. Visibility is key for employees in remembering and applying the vision.

Just like a movie, ensuring your employees are passionate about the script or, in this case, the vision statement for your company, is crucial for success. High employee engagement and understanding of the organization’s goals and vision lead to growth and achievement for a company and its workforce.

About the Author

Weylin Miller

As an instructional designer, Weylin Miller is responsible for researching, designing and building e-learning courses on compliance and leadership. He brings more than half a decade of experience in onboarding and training managers and new hires, as well as continuing education for existing employees. Miller holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and a master’s degree in secondary education, both from the University of Central Oklahoma.

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